Text size
Home / Training Programs

What are the Sepsis Canada & LifTING Programs?

  • FREE health research training programs
  • Funded by CIHR
  • Focus on sepsis and life-threatening illnesses
  • Virtual interactive sessions & access to online content via one user-friendly platform
  • Training in research skills, anti-oppressive practices, & interdisciplinary teamwork
  • Mentorship and networking opportunities, training awards, & annual symposium

Application submission deadline: Recruitment for the next cohort begins April, 2023

Sepsis Canada & LifTING Research Training Programs

 

In 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) identified sepsis as a global health priority, urging “specific actions to reduce the burden of sepsis through improved prevention, diagnosis, and management”. Understanding the importance of this recommendation, the Sepsis Canada Research Network, funded by the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR), has created the Sepsis Canada Interdisciplinary Research Training Program. This program aims to help future sepsis researchers develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to perform high-quality sepsis research, which will improve the care and outcomes of Canadian sepsis patients.

Who Should Apply?

Sepsis research is complex and requires input from many stakeholders. The Sepsis Canada Interdisciplinary Research Training Program wants to attract various trainee candidates, including patient and family partners, early-career researchers, healthcare professionals, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, research staff, knowledge translators, and community members.

Curriculum Overview

The program is delivered virtually over two years. Each academic year starts in September and ends in June. We expect trainees to invest about 70 to 80 hours per year (the equivalent of one full work day per month) to meet program requirements. Trainees will learn through preselected learning materials that can be reviewed individually (e.g., readings, podcasts), live interactive virtual sessions and workshops, and short individual or group exercises. Interactive virtual sessions are scheduled on different days and times of the week to promote equal attendance of trainees, regardless of location and work schedule. All live sessions will also be recorded and available for subsequent review.

In Year 1 all trainees follow a core curriculum to gain a broad understanding of sepsis research through three lenses: (1) partnership with patients and families; (2) biomedical research; and (3) clinical, population health, and health services research. Personal and professional development topics in this curriculum include anti-oppressive practices, social justice, Indigenous ways of knowing, research ethics, and multidisciplinary teamwork.

In Year 2 trainees complete more advanced online modules based on their choice of one of three specialization streams: (1) Patient and Family Partnership; (2) Biomedical Research, or (3) Clinical, Population Health, and Health Services Research. Based on individual learning needs, trainees may also register for elective modules in any stream.

Mentorship, Networking, and Professional Development

Central to the program are mentorship, networking, and professional development opportunities. Over the first few months of Year 1, trainees will be encouraged to identify a mentor within Sepsis Canada or another partner organization to receive longitudinal mentorship. Our program will provide multiple opportunities for trainees to find a mentor with whom they have affinities. To further promote networking with different sepsis research stakeholders, an in-person Sepsis Canada Annual Symposium will be held with presentations and workshops. Trainees will be sponsored by the Sepsis Canada Network to attend this activity. Finally, we offer training awards and experiential learning opportunities to help trainees consolidate and apply the many skills they learned throughout the program.

To learn more about the Sepsis Canada Research Project associated with this program, click here.

 

 

Canadian research on life-threatening illnesses has been incredibly productive, and yet the care and outcomes of patients suffering from life-threatening illnesses have not progressed as rapidly. Acutely ill Canadian patients also continue to experience important health inequalities related to socioeconomic status, racial or cultural background, gender, sexual orientation, and location. To overcome these barriers, the Life-Threatening Illness National Group (LifTING) Health Research Training Program was funded by the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) to train future researchers on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to engage in interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inclusive research, thus improving the care and outcomes of patients with life-threatening illnesses.

The program tackles the above issues through four core principles: (i) breaking silos between different research domains and researchers by encouraging these various groups to train together and collaborate, (ii) providing a safe learning environment where trainees can speak and be heard, (iii) integrating EDI principles, including anti-oppressive practices and social justice, throughout the program; and (iv) ensuring rigour based on best educational practices, innovative strategies, and continuous improvement of the program.

Who Should Apply?

Research on life-threatening illnesses is complex and requires input from many stakeholders. The LifTING Health Research Training Program wants to attract various trainee candidates, including patient and family partners, early-career researchers, healthcare professionals, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, research staff, knowledge translators, and community members.

Curriculum Overview

The program is delivered virtually over two years. Each academic year starts in September and ends in June. We expect trainees to invest about 70 to 80 hours per year (the equivalent of one full work day per month) to meet program requirements. Trainees will learn through preselected learning materials that can be reviewed individually (e.g., readings, podcasts), live interactive virtual sessions and workshops, and short individual or group exercises. Interactive virtual sessions are scheduled on different days and times of the week to promote equal attendance of trainees, regardless of location and work schedule. All live sessions will also be recorded and available for subsequent review.

In Year 1 all trainees follow a core curriculum to gain a broad understanding of research on life-threatening illnesses through three lenses: (1) that of an investigator; (2) of a collaborator; and (3) of a research coordinator. Personal and professional development topics in this curriculum include anti-oppressive practices, social justice, Indigenous ways of knowing, research ethics, and multidisciplinary teamwork.

In Year 2 trainees complete more advanced online modules based on their selection of one of three specialization streams: the (1) Investigator stream; (2) Collaborator stream, or (3) Research Coordinator stream. Based on individual learning needs, trainees may also register for elective modules that belong to any stream.

Mentorship, Networking, and Professional Development

Central to the program are mentorship, networking, and professional development opportunities. Over the first few months of Year 1, trainees will be encouraged to identify a mentor within the or another partner organization to receive longitudinal mentorship. Our program will provide multiple opportunities for trainees to find a mentor with whom they have affinities. To further promote networking with different research stakeholders, an in-person Annual Symposium will be held with presentations and workshops. Trainees will be sponsored to attend this activity. Finally, we offer training awards and experiential learning opportunities to help trainees consolidate and apply the many skills they learned throughout the program.

To read the full press release on this grant, click here.

 

The instructions below apply to both the Sepsis Canada and LifTING Research Training Programs. Note there is also an option to join both programs simultaneously because many of the program requirements overlap. This increases the total time commitment from about 70–80 hours per year to about 90–100 hours per year. Upon completion of program requirements for both programs, you will be awarded two separate certificates.

Please prepare the 4 elements listed below and merge them into a single Microsoft Word or PDF document. After, complete the following online application form.

Alternatively, if you prefer to submit a hardcopy application through the mail, download the form and complete it, append the four elements outlined above, then send it to the following address: 

Attn: Dr. Dominique Piquette, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, room D-108, Toronto, ON, M4N3M5

Application submission deadline: Recruitment for the next cohort begins April, 2023

1. Personal Statement

Write a 1-page personal statement (maximum 500 words) speaking to the following:

a) Why are you applying? What are your motivations for investing your time to pursue this training? How do you expect this training to benefit you and/or the groups you belong to?

b) What research experience (e.g., as a user, collaborator, lead investigator, study participant, and so on) do you have, if any? What are your interests and life experiences with respect to the Canadian healthcare system, and if applicable, with life-threatening illness or sepsis?

c) How would you describe your ability and willingness to work within diverse teams by collaborating with colleagues who may have different professional backgrounds, priorities, or values?

d) What are your views on patient and family members participating in healthcare organizations to conduct research and/or guide policy decision-making (e.g., related to sepsis or life-threatening illness)?

e) What are your long-term personal or career goals, and how will this training help you achieve them?

2. Anti-Oppression & Social Justice Statement

Include a brief statement (maximum 150 words) outlining your commitment to anti-oppressive practices and social justice, which are often framed broadly as equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI). You are encouraged to draw upon your past experiences and to include any relevant objectives you may have.

3. Curriculum Vitae or Resume 

Include your curriculum vitae or resume (maximum 5 pages) and ensure it supports the points in your personal statement. Where applicable, include your education, training, professional activities, volunteer work, organization memberships, community engagement activities, research experience (if any), publications and grants (if any), awards, special recognitions, etc. 

4. Letter of Support

Lastly, include a letter of support written by someone who knows you professionally (such as a mentor, co-worker, employer, champion/lead from an organization or group to which you have belonged) that speaks to your interests, abilities, and/or experiences in alignment with your personal statement. If applicable, the letter should explain how this person and/or organization plans to support you if you are accepted into the program.

For any inquiries about the program or application process, please contact the Program Manager, Dr. Andrew LoGiudice (andrew.logiudice@sri.utoronto.ca).